All photos/ narration courtesy of Lisa Fleming: www.flickr.com/photos/7321614@N07/with/6263441215/

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  • Lady Lawson Street : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This piece is on the side of what is known as Edinburgh’s ugliest building. The building was used as local and Government offices but is now mostly vacant. In the background is Edinburgh Castle. A castle has been on this site (situated on top of an extinct volcano and one of the highest points in Edinburgh) since the 11th century. It is the main draw of tourism to Edinburgh and is visible from almost every pointing the city.

  • Calton Road (New Street) : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This relatively new road connects the old town and Regent Road and used to house an ancient brewery. During medieval times water was not safe to drink and so beer and wine were drunk by everyone including children. The houses in the background of this picture are the back of the houses on the Royal Mile. New Street connects The Royal Mile with Calton Road and Calton Hill. Behind these blue boards was once Edinburgh’s first gas works. The site was later developed in to a bud depot and more recently artists studios. The site was cleared a few years ago to make way for a new development.

  • Roxburgh Place : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This church was, until very recently the home of the Embassy Gallery and the Roxy bar and exhibition space. It is now owned by Edinburgh University Settlement. It was originally built around 1845 to house the remains of Lady Glenorchy who was an influential evangelical minister.

  • Queen Street : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: By the 18th century the people of Edinburgh began to feel more secure and it was decided to build a new town outside the original walls. The competition for its design was won by a young Scottish architect, James Craig who put forward the simple grid design which survives today. It is based on three parallel streets, Queen Street, George Street and Princes Street. These streets represented money, power and status to those who had enough money to leave the over crowded Old Town for the New Town of Edinburgh, as it has become known they would have appreciated the wide streets, private gardens, formal rooms for socialising and space for kitchens and servants, as well as private toileting facilities! After the quashing of the Jacobite Rebellion, Scotland was desperate to prove it’s loyalty to the King (George lll) and what better way than to honour him through naming these new streets after him and his Queen?

  • Eddie Colla at Auld Reekie Close : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This phrase ‘Auld Reekie’ comes from the 17th century when the Old Town was so overcrowded that the smell (or reek) from burning wood and coal on fires became overpowering.

  • Macdonald Road : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This street links the top of Leith Walk and Broughton. This street is predominantly a thoroughfare between these two areas of Edinburgh and is residential, with this closed down pub being the only real landmark on the street. Leith walk used to be one of the longest streets in Edinburgh and runs all the way down to the docks. Leith Walk contains most notably the Boundary Bar (formerly the City Limits Bar), which, until the 1920’s, marked the boundary between Leith and Edinburgh. This bar had different licensing rules depending upon which half of the bar you were in. The Edinburgh side of the bar was bigger and we therefore allowed to open later so once the bell for last orders was rung on the Leith side of the bar, everyone squeezed in to the Edinburgh side.

  • Meadow Lane : Edinburgh, Scotland

    The Meadows is public park land situated in the heart of Edinburgh. This area was previously a loch, and provided much of the town with it’s water supply until it was drained by Sir Thomas Hope in 1722. The land was then used as grazing for cattle and as a park. Prior to this gentrification, it is said that the links (across fro the Meadows) was used as a burial site for the thousands of plague victims who perished from the 15th century until the 18th century. This are, which at the time was outside the city walls, was used to isolate victims.

  • Thistle Street : Edinburgh, Scotland

    This street, along with Rose Street, was named to commemorate the act of the unions in 1707.

  • Chapel Wynd : Edinburgh, Scotland

    This small lane just off Edinburgh’s historic Grassmarket, is in one of the oldest areas of Edinburgh and directly below Edinburgh Castle. There have been markets (including horse and meat markets) since at least the 1500’s. The Grassmarket is also notorious as the place from which to view public executions.

  • Grindlay Court : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This small lane connects Bread Street and Grindlay Street and is part of the historic area of The West Port, famous, most notably, as being the area where body snatcher and murderer William Hare resided. William Hare and his accomplice William Burke lured unsuspecting victims back to his lodgings at Tanner Close in order to kill them and sell their bodies to the medical school at Edinburgh University for dissection.

  • Meadow Lane : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: The Meadows is public park land situated in the heart of Edinburgh. This area was previously a loch, and provided much of the town with it’s water supply until it was drained by Sir Thomas Hope in 1722. The land was then used as grazing for cattle and as a park. Prior to this gentrification, it is said that the links (across fro the Meadows) was used as a burial site for the thousands of plague victims who perished from the 15th century until the 18th century. This are, which at the time was outside the city walls, was used to isolate victims.

  • Eddie Colla at Middle Meadow Walk : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: Middle Meadow Walk (main walk way through the Meadows). The Meadows is public park land situated in the heart of Edinburgh. This area was previously a loch, and provided much of the town with it’s water supply until it was drained by Sir Thomas Hope in 1722. The land was then used as grazing for cattle and as a park. Prior to this gentrification, it is said that the links (across fro the Meadows) was used as a burial site for the thousands of plague victims who perished from the 15th century until the 18th century. This are, which at the time was outside the city walls, was used to isolate victims.

  • Eddie Colla at New Street : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This relatively new road connects the old town and Regent Road and used to house an ancient brewery. During medieval times water was not safe to drink and so beer and wine were drunk by everyone including children. The houses in the background of this picture are the back of the houses on the Royal Mile. PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: New Street connects The Royal Mile with Calton Road and Calton Hill. Behind these blue boards was once Edinburgh’s first gas works. The site was later developed in to a bud depot and more recently artists studios. The site was cleared a few years ago to make way for a new development.

  • Roxburgh Place : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This church was, until very recently the home of the Embassy Gallery and the Roxy bar and exhibition space. It is now owned by Edinburgh University Settlement. It was originally built around 1845 to house the remains of Lady Glenorchy who was an influential evangelical minister.

  • Tarvit Street : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This piece is against the side of the Kings Theatre, opened in 1906. The auditorium now seats around 1,300 people and is still used for national touring shows and pantomime. Tarvit Street links the areas of Tollcross and the Meadows. The area is made up of Victorian tenement housing and used to be an area of industry including a large brewery, slaughterhouse, paraffin works and saw mill.

  • Hugh Leeman at Carrubber’s Close : Edinburgh, Scotland

    Notable residents have included Allan Ramsay (1684-1758), and James Young Simpson, who discovered the anaesthetic properties of chloroform while running a dispensary on this site. It was also home to two Episcopalian meeting houses around 1745 when, in order to practice their religion, ministers had to read from the common bible and swear an oath to Queen Anne.

  • The Meadows : Edinburgh, Scotland

    The Meadows is public park land situated in the heart of Edinburgh. This area was previously a loch, and provided much of the town with it’s water supply until it was drained by Sir Thomas Hope in 1722. The land was then used as grazing for cattle and as a park. Prior to this gentrification, it is said that the links (across fro the Meadows) was used as a burial site for the thousands of plague victims who perished from the 15th century until the 18th century. This are, which at the time was outside the city walls, was used to isolate victims.

  • Lauriston Place : Edinburgh, Scotland

  • Lauriston Gardens (Looking on to The Meadows) : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: The Meadows is public park land situated in the heart of Edinburgh. This area was previously a loch, and provided much of the town with it’s water supply until it was drained by Sir Thomas Hope in 1722. The land was then used as grazing for cattle and as a park. Prior to this gentrification, it is said that the links (across fro the Meadows) was used as a burial site for the thousands of plague victims who perished from the 15th century until the 18th century. This are, which at the time was outside the city walls, was used to isolate victims.

  • Up with Eddie Colla at Broughton Road (pronounced; bro-ton) Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: Broughton is an ancient feudal barony known for its witchcraft. Today it has an Edinburgh City Council refuse depot (in the background of the picture with the blue police box).

  • Broughton Road (pronounced; bro-ton) : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: Broughton is an ancient feudal barony known for its witchcraft. Today it has an Edinburgh City Council refuse depot (in the background of the picture with the blue police box).These boxes were introduced so that members of the public could use the telephone inside to call directly to the nearest police station in times of emergency. Additionally, the boxes were used by the police as mini police stations and contained fire extinguishers, a stool and sometimes a small heater. The police boxes are now known more as Doctor Who’s Tardis.

  • Buccleuch Street (pronounced; buck-loo): Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: Near to Edinburgh University, it is believed that Robert Burns lodged near here for a short time with his publisher.

  • Cowgate : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: The name of this street derives from the herding of cows to market down this road in ancient times. Until fairly recently (post- WWll) it was a slum area, housing Irish immigrants including James Connolly who was executed in Ireland by firing squad following his role as leader of the Easter Rebellion in 1916.

  • Fountainbridge : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: Sean Connery was born in this area and named his production company after it. This shot is at the back of the shops which look out on to Earl Grey Street. Gloucester Street, Stockbridge (pronounced gloster) Stockbridge takes it name from the Scots words "stocc brycg" meaning a timber foot bridge after the original bridge that crossed the Water of Leith to the small village. Since it was created it has had a bohemian vibe and many notable artist have lived there including portrait artist Sir Henry Raeburn, poet James Hogg, surgeon Sir James Young Simpson and more recently Shirley Manson of Garbage. It was also the home of the original Mrs. Doubtfire, immortalised by Robin Williams in the film of the same name.

  • Gloucester Street : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING

  • Eddie Colla at Hill Square : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: These apartments were built to house students and tutors from the Royal College of Surgeons which is just around the corner. These buildings were probably built around the time of the new Surgeon’s hall, which was designed by William Playfair in the mid 19th century.

  • Lady Lawson Street : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This piece is on the side of what is known as Edinburgh’s ugliest building. The building was used as local and Government offices but is now mostly vacant. In the background is Edinburgh Castle. A castle has been on this site (situated on top of an extinct volcano and one of the highest points in Edinburgh) since the 11th century. It is the main draw of tourism to Edinburgh and is visible from almost every pointing the city.

  • Calton Road (New Street) : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This relatively new road connects the old town and Regent Road and used to house an ancient brewery. During medieval times water was not safe to drink and so beer and wine were drunk by everyone including children. The houses in the background of this picture are the back of the houses on the Royal Mile. New Street connects The Royal Mile with Calton Road and Calton Hill. Behind these blue boards was once Edinburgh’s first gas works. The site was later developed in to a bud depot and more recently artists studios. The site was cleared a few years ago to make way for a new development.

  • Roxburgh Place : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This church was, until very recently the home of the Embassy Gallery and the Roxy bar and exhibition space. It is now owned by Edinburgh University Settlement. It was originally built around 1845 to house the remains of Lady Glenorchy who was an influential evangelical minister.

  • Queen Street : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: By the 18th century the people of Edinburgh began to feel more secure and it was decided to build a new town outside the original walls. The competition for its design was won by a young Scottish architect, James Craig who put forward the simple grid design which survives today. It is based on three parallel streets, Queen Street, George Street and Princes Street. These streets represented money, power and status to those who had enough money to leave the over crowded Old Town for the New Town of Edinburgh, as it has become known they would have appreciated the wide streets, private gardens, formal rooms for socialising and space for kitchens and servants, as well as private toileting facilities! After the quashing of the Jacobite Rebellion, Scotland was desperate to prove it’s loyalty to the King (George lll) and what better way than to honour him through naming these new streets after him and his Queen?

  • Eddie Colla at Auld Reekie Close : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This phrase ‘Auld Reekie’ comes from the 17th century when the Old Town was so overcrowded that the smell (or reek) from burning wood and coal on fires became overpowering.

  • Macdonald Road : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This street links the top of Leith Walk and Broughton. This street is predominantly a thoroughfare between these two areas of Edinburgh and is residential, with this closed down pub being the only real landmark on the street. Leith walk used to be one of the longest streets in Edinburgh and runs all the way down to the docks. Leith Walk contains most notably the Boundary Bar (formerly the City Limits Bar), which, until the 1920’s, marked the boundary between Leith and Edinburgh. This bar had different licensing rules depending upon which half of the bar you were in. The Edinburgh side of the bar was bigger and we therefore allowed to open later so once the bell for last orders was rung on the Leith side of the bar, everyone squeezed in to the Edinburgh side.

  • Meadow Lane : Edinburgh, Scotland

    The Meadows is public park land situated in the heart of Edinburgh. This area was previously a loch, and provided much of the town with it’s water supply until it was drained by Sir Thomas Hope in 1722. The land was then used as grazing for cattle and as a park. Prior to this gentrification, it is said that the links (across fro the Meadows) was used as a burial site for the thousands of plague victims who perished from the 15th century until the 18th century. This are, which at the time was outside the city walls, was used to isolate victims.

  • Thistle Street : Edinburgh, Scotland

    This street, along with Rose Street, was named to commemorate the act of the unions in 1707.

  • Chapel Wynd : Edinburgh, Scotland

    This small lane just off Edinburgh’s historic Grassmarket, is in one of the oldest areas of Edinburgh and directly below Edinburgh Castle. There have been markets (including horse and meat markets) since at least the 1500’s. The Grassmarket is also notorious as the place from which to view public executions.

  • Grindlay Court : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This small lane connects Bread Street and Grindlay Street and is part of the historic area of The West Port, famous, most notably, as being the area where body snatcher and murderer William Hare resided. William Hare and his accomplice William Burke lured unsuspecting victims back to his lodgings at Tanner Close in order to kill them and sell their bodies to the medical school at Edinburgh University for dissection.

  • Meadow Lane : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: The Meadows is public park land situated in the heart of Edinburgh. This area was previously a loch, and provided much of the town with it’s water supply until it was drained by Sir Thomas Hope in 1722. The land was then used as grazing for cattle and as a park. Prior to this gentrification, it is said that the links (across fro the Meadows) was used as a burial site for the thousands of plague victims who perished from the 15th century until the 18th century. This are, which at the time was outside the city walls, was used to isolate victims.

  • Eddie Colla at Middle Meadow Walk : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: Middle Meadow Walk (main walk way through the Meadows). The Meadows is public park land situated in the heart of Edinburgh. This area was previously a loch, and provided much of the town with it’s water supply until it was drained by Sir Thomas Hope in 1722. The land was then used as grazing for cattle and as a park. Prior to this gentrification, it is said that the links (across fro the Meadows) was used as a burial site for the thousands of plague victims who perished from the 15th century until the 18th century. This are, which at the time was outside the city walls, was used to isolate victims.

  • Eddie Colla at New Street : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This relatively new road connects the old town and Regent Road and used to house an ancient brewery. During medieval times water was not safe to drink and so beer and wine were drunk by everyone including children. The houses in the background of this picture are the back of the houses on the Royal Mile. PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: New Street connects The Royal Mile with Calton Road and Calton Hill. Behind these blue boards was once Edinburgh’s first gas works. The site was later developed in to a bud depot and more recently artists studios. The site was cleared a few years ago to make way for a new development.

  • Roxburgh Place : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This church was, until very recently the home of the Embassy Gallery and the Roxy bar and exhibition space. It is now owned by Edinburgh University Settlement. It was originally built around 1845 to house the remains of Lady Glenorchy who was an influential evangelical minister.

  • Tarvit Street : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: This piece is against the side of the Kings Theatre, opened in 1906. The auditorium now seats around 1,300 people and is still used for national touring shows and pantomime. Tarvit Street links the areas of Tollcross and the Meadows. The area is made up of Victorian tenement housing and used to be an area of industry including a large brewery, slaughterhouse, paraffin works and saw mill.

  • Hugh Leeman at Carrubber’s Close : Edinburgh, Scotland

    Notable residents have included Allan Ramsay (1684-1758), and James Young Simpson, who discovered the anaesthetic properties of chloroform while running a dispensary on this site. It was also home to two Episcopalian meeting houses around 1745 when, in order to practice their religion, ministers had to read from the common bible and swear an oath to Queen Anne.

  • The Meadows : Edinburgh, Scotland

    The Meadows is public park land situated in the heart of Edinburgh. This area was previously a loch, and provided much of the town with it’s water supply until it was drained by Sir Thomas Hope in 1722. The land was then used as grazing for cattle and as a park. Prior to this gentrification, it is said that the links (across fro the Meadows) was used as a burial site for the thousands of plague victims who perished from the 15th century until the 18th century. This are, which at the time was outside the city walls, was used to isolate victims.

  • Lauriston Gardens (Looking on to The Meadows) : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: The Meadows is public park land situated in the heart of Edinburgh. This area was previously a loch, and provided much of the town with it’s water supply until it was drained by Sir Thomas Hope in 1722. The land was then used as grazing for cattle and as a park. Prior to this gentrification, it is said that the links (across fro the Meadows) was used as a burial site for the thousands of plague victims who perished from the 15th century until the 18th century. This are, which at the time was outside the city walls, was used to isolate victims.

  • Up with Eddie Colla at Broughton Road (pronounced; bro-ton) Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: Broughton is an ancient feudal barony known for its witchcraft. Today it has an Edinburgh City Council refuse depot (in the background of the picture with the blue police box).

  • Broughton Road (pronounced; bro-ton) : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: Broughton is an ancient feudal barony known for its witchcraft. Today it has an Edinburgh City Council refuse depot (in the background of the picture with the blue police box).These boxes were introduced so that members of the public could use the telephone inside to call directly to the nearest police station in times of emergency. Additionally, the boxes were used by the police as mini police stations and contained fire extinguishers, a stool and sometimes a small heater. The police boxes are now known more as Doctor Who’s Tardis.

  • Buccleuch Street (pronounced; buck-loo): Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: Near to Edinburgh University, it is believed that Robert Burns lodged near here for a short time with his publisher.

  • Cowgate : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: The name of this street derives from the herding of cows to market down this road in ancient times. Until fairly recently (post- WWll) it was a slum area, housing Irish immigrants including James Connolly who was executed in Ireland by firing squad following his role as leader of the Easter Rebellion in 1916.

  • Fountainbridge : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: Sean Connery was born in this area and named his production company after it. This shot is at the back of the shops which look out on to Earl Grey Street. Gloucester Street, Stockbridge (pronounced gloster) Stockbridge takes it name from the Scots words "stocc brycg" meaning a timber foot bridge after the original bridge that crossed the Water of Leith to the small village. Since it was created it has had a bohemian vibe and many notable artist have lived there including portrait artist Sir Henry Raeburn, poet James Hogg, surgeon Sir James Young Simpson and more recently Shirley Manson of Garbage. It was also the home of the original Mrs. Doubtfire, immortalised by Robin Williams in the film of the same name.

  • Gloucester Street : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING

  • Eddie Colla at Hill Square : Edinburgh, Scotland

    PHOTO/ NARRATION BY LISA FLEMING: These apartments were built to house students and tutors from the Royal College of Surgeons which is just around the corner. These buildings were probably built around the time of the new Surgeon’s hall, which was designed by William Playfair in the mid 19th century.